What is glycemic index? And is it important?

Have you ever had your blood
sugar levels tested or heard about eating to balance blood sugar?
You know I talk about it a bunch, so if you have ever worked with me you have heard this. 
Have you
wondered about the science behind how foods affect blood sugar? 
Or more
importantly, which foods affect your blood sugar more than others?
If so, this post is for you. If not you, maybe someone you love.
It’s all about the glycemic index
and glycemic load. And it’s not boring, promise!
Read on because you may want
to pay attention to foods that are high on the glycemic index or high glycemic
load. And if you’re at risk of blood sugar issues, pancreas conditions, or even
diabetes this is IMPORTANT for you to know. And if you aren’t and don’t want to ever be, this is important too.

What is the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load?
Glycemic this and glycemic that.
Does it matter?
You’ll notice that they both
begin with “glycemic.” That’s one tip that they have to do with
sugars and carbs. Not only how much sugar is in foods, but more importantly,
how it affects your blood sugar levels.
In general, diets that are high
on the glycemic index (GI) and high in glycemic load (GL), tend to increase the
risk of diabetes and heart disease.
FUN FACT: Starches like those in
potatoes and grains are digested into sugar; this is because starch is just a bunch
of sugars linked together. Digestive enzymes break those bonds so that the
sugars become free. Then those sugars affect your body the same way that eating
sugary foods do.
Glycemic Index (or “how fast”)
The most common of the two terms
is “glycemic index” (GI).
As the name suggests, it
“indexes” (or compares) the effect that different foods have on your
blood sugar level. Then each food is given a score from 0 (no effect on blood
sugar) to 100 (big effect on blood sugar). Foods that cause a fast increase
in blood sugar have a high GI. That is because the sugar in them is quickly
processed by your digestive system and absorbed into your blood. They cause a
“spike” in your blood sugar.
So, you can probably guess that
pure glucose is given a GI rating of 100. On the other hand, chickpeas are
right down there at a GI of 10.
Regarding GI: low is anything
under 55; moderate is 56-69, and 70+ is considered a high GI food.
Remember, this is a measure of
how fast a carbohydrate containing food is digested and raised your blood
sugar. It’s not a measure of the sugar content of the food.
How the carbohydrates in food
affect your blood sugar level depend on other components of the food. Things
like fiber and protein can slow the release of sugar into the bloodstream, and
this can make even a high-sugar food, low on the GI scale.
So, lower GI foods are better at
keeping your blood sugar levels stable because they don’t increase your blood
sugar level as fast.
FUN FACT: Can you guess which
food has a GI of higher than 100? (Think of something super-starchy) White
potatoes! They have a GI of 111.
Glycemic Load (or “how much”)
The glycemic load is different.
Glycemic load (GL) doesn’t take
into account how quickly your blood sugar “spikes”, but it looks at how high
that spike is. Basically, how much the food increases your
blood sugar.
GL depends on two things. First,
how much sugar is actually in the food. Second, how much of the food is
typically eaten.
Low GL would be 0-10,  moderate GL would be 10-20, and high GL would
20+.
Example of GL and GI
 So, let’s compare average (120 g) servings of
bananas and oranges:
Food
GI
Serving size (g)
GL per serving
Banana,
average
48
120
11
Oranges,
average
45
120
5
Excerpt from: Harvard Health
Publications, Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods
As you can see, the banana and
orange have almost the same glycemic index.; this means they both raise your
blood sugar in about the same amount of time.
But, the average banana raises
the blood sugar twice as high (11) as the orange does (5). So, it contains more
overall sugar than the same amount (120 g) of orange.
Of course, this is all relative.
A GL of 11 is not high at all. Please keep eating whole fruits. This is an easy example.

So…What does this all mean for
your health?
Certain people should be aware of
the effects that foods have on their blood sugar. People who have diabetes or
pre-diabetes conditions like insulin resistance  need to be aware of the glycemic index and
glycemic load of foods they are eating regularly.
The GI and GL are just two
factors to consider when it comes to blood sugar. Some high GI foods are pretty
good for you but if you want to reduce the impact on your blood sugar, have
them with a high-fiber or high-protein food. That’s why I always talk about eating with a fiber food or protein.
Conclusion
If you have blood sugar
imbalances or diabetes, you should probably be aware of the GI and GL of your
food.
If you are at risk of diabetes or
heart disease, you might try swapping out some higher GI/GL foods and replacing
with lower GI/GL foods.
If you want to prevent either of those in the future, remember these tips.
Oh, and check out this low GI recipe I
have for you.
Recipe (low GI): Mediterranean
Salad
Serves 2
1 cucumber, chopped
½ cup chickpeas, drained and
rinsed
½ cup black olives
¼ red onion, diced
½ cup cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp garlic
1 tsp basil
½ tsp oregano
1 dash sea salt
1 dash black pepper
Place first five ingredients
together in a bowl.
Add remaining ingredients to a
jar (to make the dressing) with a tight-fitting lid and shake vigorously.
Add dressing to salad and gently
toss.
Serve & enjoy!
Tip:
Add chopped avocado for even more fiber and healthy fat.
When you try it…come back here and let me know!



References:

Oh, the words “blood sugar.”

How Do I Keep My Blood Sugar Stable?
And do I need to worry about it if I am not a diagnosed diabetic?
Oh, the words “blood
sugar.”
Does it conjure up visions of
restrictive eating, diabetes medications, or insulin injections?
Blood sugar is the measure of the
amount of sugar in your blood. You need the right balance of sugar in your
blood to fuel your brain and muscles.
The thing is, it can fluctuate. A
lot.
This fluctuation is the natural
balance between things that increase it; and things that decrease it. When you
eat food with sugars or starches (“carbs”), then your digestive
system absorbs sugar into your blood. When carbs are ingested and broken down
into simple sugars, your body keeps blood sugar levels stable by secreting
insulin. Insulin allows excess sugar to get it out of your bloodstream and into
your muscle cells and other tissues
 for energy
Why keep my blood sugar
stable?
Your body wants your blood sugar
to be at an optimal level. It should be high enough, so you’re not
light-headed, fatigued, and irritable. It should be low enough that your body
isn’t scrambling to remove excess from the blood.
When blood sugar is too low, this
is referred to as “hypoglycemia.”
When blood sugar is too high, it
is referred to as hyperglycemia. 
Prolonged periods of elevated blood sugar levels (chronic hyperglycemia)
can lead to “insulin resistance.”
Insulin resistance is when your
cells are just so bored of the excess insulin that they start ignoring
(resisting) it, and that keeps your blood sugar levels too high.
Insulin resistance and chronic
hyperglycemia can eventually lead to diabetes.
So let’s look at how you can
optimize your food and lifestyle to keep your blood sugar stable.
Food for stable blood sugar
The simplest thing to do to
balance your blood sugar is to reduce the number of refined sugars and starches
you eat.  To do this, you can start by
dumping sweet drinks and having smaller portions of dessert.
Eating more fiber is helpful too.
Fiber helps to slow down the amount of sugar absorbed from your meal; it
reduces the “spike” in your blood sugar level.  Fiber is found in plant-based foods (as long
as they are eaten in their natural state, processing foods removed fiber).  Eating nuts, seeds, and whole fruits and
veggies (not juiced) is a great way to increase your fiber intake.
FUN FACT: Cinnamon has been shown
to help cells increase insulin sensitivity. Not to mention it’s a delicious
spice that can be used in place of sugar. (HINT: It’s in the recipe below)
Lifestyle for stable blood
sugar
Exercise also helps to improve
your insulin sensitivity; this means that your cells don’t ignore insulin’s
call to get excess sugar out of the blood. 
Not to mention, when you exercise, your muscles are using up that sugar
they absorbed from your blood. But you already knew that exercise is healthy,
didn’t you?
Would you believe that stress
affects your blood sugar levels? Yup! Stress hormones increase your blood sugar
levels. If you think about the “fight or flight” stress response,
what fuel do your brain and muscles need to “fight” or “flee”?
Sugar! When you are stressed signals are sent to release stored forms of sugar
back into the bloodstream, increasing blood sugar levels.  So, try to reduce the stress you’re under and
manage it more effectively. Simple tips are meditation, deep breathing, or
gentle movement.
Sleep goes hand-in-hand with
stress. When you don’t get enough quality sleep, you tend to release stress
hormones, have a higher appetite, and even get sugar cravings. Sleep is
crucial, often overlooked, factor when it comes to keeping your blood sugar
stable. Make sleep more of a priority – it will do your blood sugar (and the
rest of your physical and mental health) good.
Conclusion
Your body is on a constant
24-hour quest to keep your blood sugar stable. The body has mechanisms in place
to do this, but those mechanisms can get tired (resistant).  Long-term blood sugar issues can spell
trouble.
There are many nutrition and
lifestyle approaches you can take to help keep your blood sugar stable.
Minimizing excessive carbs, and eating more fiber, exercising, reducing stress,
and improving sleep are all key to having stable blood sugar (and overall good
health).
Recipe (blood sugar
balancing): Cinnamon Apples
Serves 4
2 apples, chopped
1 tbsp coconut oil
½ tsp ground cinnamon
⅛ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp vanilla extract
Place chopped apples into a small
saucepan with 2 tbsp water. Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring
occasionally. After about 5 minutes the apples will become slightly soft, and
water will be absorbed.
Add 1 tbsp coconut oil. Stir
apples and oil together.
Cook for another 5 minutes,
stirring every minute or so.
Add cinnamon, salt, and vanilla.
Stir well.
Cook for another few minutes,
stirring until the apples reach your desired softness!

Serve and enjoy!

Tip: Keeping the peel on increases the fiber, which
is even better for stabilizing your blood sugar.
References:
Let me know when you try the recipe!  And if you want to know more on specifically how to stabilize your Blood Sugar…reach out!  I am here to support you.

Five Weight-Loss Friendly Snacks You Will Love

Five Weight-Loss
Friendly Snacks You Will Love
The words “weight-loss” and “snacks” often appear in the same sentence. But that might also bring thoughts of “tasteless,” “cardboard,” and “completely unsatisfying.” Right?
Let me give you my best weight-loss friendly snacks that aren’t just nutritious but also delicious!
What’s my criteria you ask? They have to be nutrient-dense whole foods where a little goes a long way;  foods that contain protein and/or fiber.
1 – Nuts
It’s true – nuts contain calories and fat, but they are NOT
fattening! Well, I’m not talking about the “honey roasted” ones, of
course. Those probably are fattening. Studies show that people who eat nuts tend to be healthier and leaner.
By the way, nuts also contain protein and fiber, which means a small amount can go pretty far in terms of filling you up. Not to mention the vitamins and minerals you can get from nuts.
Did you know that almonds have been shown to help with weight loss? At least 10% of the fat in them is not absorbed by the body, and almonds can also help to boost your metabolism!
Tip: Put a handful of unsalted/unsweetened nuts into a small container and throw it in your purse or bag.
 2 – Fresh Fruit
As with nuts, studies show that people who tend to eat more fruit, tend to be healthier. (I’m sure you’re not too surprised!)
Yes, fresh fruit contains sugar, but whole fruits (I’m not talking juice or sweetened dried fruit) also contain a fair bit of water and
fiber; not to mention their nutritional value with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. And fresh fruit is low in calories.
Fiber is something that not only helps to fill you up (known as the “satiety factor”) but also helps to slow the release of the
fruit sugar into your bloodstream and reduce the notorious “blood sugar spike.”
 Win-win!
Try a variety of fruit (apples, pears, berries, etc.) and pair that with a handful of nuts.
Tip: Can’t do fresh? Try frozen. Plus, they’re already chopped for you.
 3 – Chia seeds
This is one of my personal favorites…Chia is not only high in fiber, but it also contains protein and omega-3 fatty acids (yes THOSE omega-3s!). As well as antioxidants, calcium, and magnesium.
 Have you seen how awesome these tiny guys are?
They also absorb a lot of liquid, so by soaking them for a few minutes, they make a thick pudding (that is delicious and fills you up).
Check this recipe out!
Prep time
15 mins
Total time
15 mins
Author: Minimalist Baker
Vegan, Gluten-Free
Serves: 4
Ingredients
·         1 1/2 cups (360 ml) Almond Breeze Almondmilk Original Unsweetened
·         1/3 cup (63 g) chia seeds
·         1/4 cup (24 g) cacao or unsweetened cocoa powder
·         2-5 Tbsp (30-75 ml) maple syrup if not blending (can sub 5-9 dates, pitted, if
blending)
·         optional: 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
·         1/4 tsp sea salt
·         optional: 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions


Add all ingredients except sweetener to a mixing bowl and whisk vigorously to
combine. If not blending (which I preferred!), sweeten to taste with maple
syrup at this time. If blending, you can sweeten later with maple syrup or
dates.
Let rest covered in the fridge overnight or at least 3-5 hours (or until it’s achieved a pudding-like
consistency). If blending, add to a blender and blend until completely smooth and creamy, scraping down sides as needed.
Sweeten to taste.
Leftovers keep covered in the fridge for 2-3 days, though best when fresh.
Serve chilled with desired toppings, such as fruit, granola, or coconut whipped cream.
*Nutrition information is a rough estimate for 1 of 4 servings.
*Prep time does not include chilling!
*Recipe loosely adapted from Pop Sugar.


Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1/4
of recipe Calories: 133 Fat: 8 g Saturated
fat: 1.2 g Carbohydrates: 17
g Sugar: 9gSodium: 187mg Fiber: 8.6
g Protein: 5.3 g
4 – Boiled or poached eggs
Eggs are packed with nutrition and most of it is in the yolk. They contain a lot of high-quality protein and a good amount
of vitamins and minerals. And recent research shows that the cholesterol in the yolks is NOT associated with high elevated cholesterol or heart disease risk.
 Yep, you read that right!
Tip: Boil a bunch of eggs and keep them in your fridge for a super-quick (and nutritious) snack!
5 – Vegetables
I don’t need to tell you how great these are for you, but just maybe I need to sell you on the delicious “snackability” of these
nutrition powerhouses. Veggies contain fibre and water to help fill you up, and you don’t need me to tell you about their vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, right?
You can easily open a bag of baby carrots and/or cherry tomatoes and give them a quick rinse (they’re already bite-sized).
Tip: Use a bit of dip. Have you put almond butter on celery?
Conclusion:
Go ahead and try one, or more, of these healthy snacks. Prepare them the night before if you need to. They will not be
“tasteless,” like “cardboard,” or “completely unsatisfying.” Trust me.

How about trying my new hummus recipe below?

Recipe (Vegetable Dip): Hummus

Makes about 2 cups
1  can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained &
rinsed
⅓ cup tahini
1 garlic clove
2 tbsp sesame oil
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 dash salt
1 dash pepper
1. Put all ingredients into a food processor and blend until smooth. You may need to thin it out with a bit
of water, so add it 1 or 2 tablespoons at a time and blend.
Serve & enjoy!
Tip: Don’t like sesame? Use an avocado in place of the tahini, and olive oil in place of the sesame oil.
Sure hope you try the Chia recipe!  When you do…leave me  message!
Yours in health and happiness,
Cheryl
References:

 

 

WOW, have your cupboards looked like this?  Mine have!  Do they still?  If you are my friend, and you follow me…I hope not! But seriously, I know many still rely on these quick fixes.  Are they all bad?  No, probably not (ok – yeah mostly) BUT what is worse is they can lead you down the path of addiction – to what?  Maybe sugar, maybe just convenience, maybe to some additives in them!  I challenge you to clean them up.  

And what can help!  Learning more about food addiction!  That’s a start!  

As a health coach, one thing I love about this industry is the connections and friendships I have made.  And the fact that we are a very diverse group.  We each have a passion for our niche!  And many of us specialize in one thing or another!  My friend Angela – she specializes in food addiction.  If you want to know more about that…join her for a FREE educational webinar on June 16th at 5PM PST/8PM EST  Just click here and register!  Or copy and paste this link into your browser.  

I am so excited for Angela – webinars are my scary place!  Can’t wait to see all the great info she brings to you! Once you watch…let me know!  
For more information about Health Coaching – what it is, how I can support your healthy changes…visit me at Imagine Fit!

Here’s a hint that you may have a food addiction!  Take this quiz!

Am I a Food Addict?

To find out, answer the following questions as honestly as you can. 

  1. Have you ever wanted to stop eating and found you just couldn’t? 
  2. Do you think about food or your weight constantly? 
  3. Do you find yourself attempting one diet or food plan after another, with no lasting success? 
  4. Do you binge and then “get rid of the binge” through vomiting, exercise, laxatives, or other forms of purging? 
  5. Do you eat differently in private than you do in front of other people? 
  6. Has a doctor or family member ever approached you with concern about your eating habits or weight? 
  7. Do you eat large quantities of food at one time (binge)?
Click here for the full quiz…Am I A Food Addict?

Thanks for your support and can’t wait to hear what you learn on this webinar…share your “aha” moments here!
Cheryl Love
INHC/AADP

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